Rabies in dogs (Extract)

Rabies in dogs (Extract)

Description: The Greek word for rabies, "lyssa" refers to the violent nature of the disease. The genus of viruses responsible for rabies belangs to the genus Lyssavirus in the family Rhabdoviridae. Rabies as well as the link between human disease and animals has been known for several thousand years, but the first meaning discriptions of the disease came from Italy in the early 1500s. In modern society rabies remains a feared disease as it was in antiquity, especially as canine rabies (street rabies) became a scourge in the 19th century. Today canine rabies is geographically widespread and continues to represent a significant public health threat, particularly in developing countries where human deaths have been estimated to be at least 50 000 annually. The World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE) has classified rabies as a List B disease, which means it has socio-economic and public health importance within affected countries, and is significant in the international trade of animals and animal products. The first part of the video provides comprehensive information on the clinical signs of rabies in all domestic animal species, some wild animals and humans. The second part of the video deals with specimen collection and transport, laboratory diagnosis, vaccination, post-exposure prohylaxis and treatment, and certain regulatory aspects relating to the control of the disease in both humans and animals. Copyright: University of Pretoria, South Africa. Video compiled and edited by: Dr PE Kloeck Mr G Bishop Mr A groenewald Mr W Myburgh Ms J Peens Dr J Godlonton Mr P Hartzenberg. Produced by the Directorate of Communications for National Department of Agriculture, and the Directorate of Veterinary Services, KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. The complete learning module is available through the African Veterinary Information Portal (AfriVIP) at: http://www.afrivip.org/education/livestock/high-impact/contagious-diseases/rabies/2013. AfriVIP is not responsible for verifying the proprietary content of the materials. Any veterinary medical information in this material is intended to inform and educate and is not a tool for diagnosis or a replacement for veterinary evaluation, advice, diagnosis or treatment by a veterinary professional. Viewer discretion is advised: Some veterinary content is graphic and may not be suitable for all viewers. This video is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution License: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/ (c) 2016. University of Pretoria, South Africa.