How to Make Friends at a New School

2009 August 31
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Howcast
How to Make Friends at a New School

Watch more School Survival videos: http://www.howcast.com/videos/210679-How-to-Make-Friends-at-a-New-School Being the new kid in school is no easy task. With some determination and the right attitude, you can quickly turn some of those strangers into friends. Step 1: Whether you like it or not, kids form initial opinions based on clothes, hair, and fashion sense. Make an extra effort to look your best those first few days. Looking good will boost your confidence, too! Tip You're not going to be rolling in friends on Day 1. Devote the first couple of weeks to laying solid groundwork. Step 2: Come out of your shell. If you're naturally shy, you don't have to fake a new personality. But try to avoid looking at the ground, and flash a smile once in a while. The easier you are to approach and start a conversation with, the more other kids will want to talk to you. Step 3: Find excuses to talk to people. Once you get a conversation going, be a good listener and offer up a compliment or two, no matter how small. Tip Build up a little courage and sit in the middle of the classroom to surround yourself with as many potential new friends as possible. Step 4: Get involved in the extra-curricular activities you enjoyed at your old school. Join a sports team, help with the yearbook, try out for a play – anything that interests you. Joining a club or team is a great way to start because you have at least one thing in common with everyone in the room. Tip Cast a wide net – don't just focus on the popular people. Making friends in different circles will open you up to more options. Step 5: Use the web. Sign up for a social-networking site and join your school's group page. Post some videos and pictures and write a few blog entries to showcase who you are. Kids at school will discover your personality through the web and all that small-talk torture will start to disappear. Step 6: Get a part-time job where you know fellow classmates work. Meeting kids outside of school and bonding over menial work is often a recipe for friendship. Did You Know? Between kindergarten and 12th grade, children in active-duty military families often change schools more than 12 times.